Android Client SDK Errors: Do You Know What The Codes Mean?

By | April 2, 2014
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Prior to testing, even highly experienced Android developers cannot be fully certain that their codes are error-free. If you have to work with the Android Client SDK, you should have a thorough idea of its error codes and the reasons why they are generated.

With nearly 26 billion Android apps downloaded in all by the end of 2013, there is no scope for doubting the leadership position of this platform over Apple iOS (which is mighty popular in its own right). The Android Software Development Kit (SDK) is relied upon by developers from all over the world, for making glitch-free, functionally advanced applications. However, if you are new in using the kit, the various Android Client SDK Error codes might leave you feeling a bit stumped. We have here explained some of these errors:

  1. Error Code 1 (Could Not Connect To Server) – The most basic Android SDK error – one that occurs either due to an Illegal Argument Exception or a URI Syntax Exception. The software development kit fails to connect with the server system, and this error message is displayed.

  2. Error Code 8 (No Authentication Scheme is Specified) – Experienced programmers from the domain of Java, Android or iPhone app development in India and overseas can generally handle the security configuration project in their codes without any errors – but novices have to be wary of this error. In case they forget to provide a correctly specified authentication scheme for the project, this error would be generated and the program would be stalled.

  3. Error Code 22 (Service Domain Mismatch) – Unless you are careful enough while creating the Single Sign-On (SSO) application of codes, this error message might get flashed. The problem comes up when the server-side domain of the application does not match with that from the client side. As a result of the mismatch, the necessary authentication procedure is invalidated/rejected.

  4. Error Code 17 (Tokens Not Available) – Professional mobile app developers and testers invariably work with web browsers that are customized for SSO authentication. In case the OAM_ID is not provided when a protected/secure URL on such a browser is accessed, this error is generated. Also, if you do not specifically set the the MobileOAMAuthentication, the ‘R.string.tokenNotAvailable’ message would be displayed.

  5. Error Code 24 (APP Signature Invalid) – All the business objects and applications called in the Android Client SDK codes have to be validated. Whenever the single sign-on is not able to perform this validation task, this exception is thrown. If you face this error, you would probably need to check the built app signature for errors.

  6. Error Code 3 (Invalid Username/Password) – Just as in the Google Drive SDK, in the Android toolkit too – server responses can be unauthorized (code: 401). That, in turn, results in this error message. Of course, if you do not declare a username and password before trying to authenticate server-side interactions, the UN_PWD_INVALID message would be flashed. A common error among coding newbies – and it can be fixed easily.

  7. Error Code 10 (User Authentication Failed) – Irrespective of whether you are creating programs for Android apps, or are simply writing codes for web applications – it is of essence to ensure that there are no internal errors in the selected server. Presence of such errors can stop the program-building, and a complete testing of the server would be necessary. Note that, this scenario is different from Error Code 8, which is invoked when the required authentication scheme is not declared/specified.

  8. Error Code 25 (Initialization Failed) – Before you start working with the Android SDK, it would be a good idea to read through all the application-initialization guidelines carefully. According to mobile application development trainers, even if a single mandatory field is not supplied, this initialization failure can result. Once you call an application through an appropriate URL scheme, make it a point to declare all the necessary fields.

  9. Error Code 12 (Unable To Open RP Authentication URL) – Google’s software development kit has all the tools required for seamless construction of the RP login files. However, it might happen that the login id has errors – leading up to this coding problem. The construct procedure can be resumed only after the URL is debugged.

  10. Error Code 6 (Device Not Authenticated) – There is a built-in RestAuthenticationService in the Android SDK, which parses for tokens for the requisite device registration. As soon as the authentication is detected to be invalid, the coder is alerted that no social and/or mobile server has yet been connected to the concerned device.

  11. Error Code 16 (Setup Failed MS) – Configuration errors lie at the root of this relatively frequent error. Whenever the service domain or the application ID is left empty, the app profile cannot be downloaded from the server (social or media). You should take a look at the server URL as well.

  12. Error Code 21 (Setup Not Invoked) – The setup API is integral to the entire coding procedure – and if you do not call it via the setup () method, this is the error you will face. The method can be found in the SDK itself, and you only need to declare it as a part of the program.

 

If you are planning to hire mobile app developers who would be proficient in knowledge-based authentication, make sure that the candidates know how ‘challenge answers’ have to be provided. The No Authentication Scheme and the User Canceled Certificate are also errors that can be generated. Being familiar with all possible errors is a vital part of learning Android Client SDK – only then can you debug your program codes quickly and with relative ease.

 

Hussain Fakhruddin
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Hussain Fakhruddin

Hussain Fakhruddin is the founder/CEO of Teknowledge mobile apps company. He heads a large team of app developers, and has overseen the creation of nearly 600 applications. Apart from app development, his interests include reading, traveling and online blogging.
Hussain Fakhruddin
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